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20121111
20121111
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
in the senate and the way it operated. it was a magnet for a lot of us coming to washington. wandering the halls, and i did not know them all in the 1970's were madeleine albright, stephen breyer, susan collins, lamar alexander. many of the leaders. and in the media today, chris matthews, george will. many of these people got their training in the senate. we were not part of the greatest generation. we have the next best thing. we were trained by them. host: our next call for ira shapiro comes from barry. you have to turn down your set. we are getting feedback. caller: i just turned it down. this is why they had more democrats back then, because of the tea party. they made our government stagnant. they are upset about capitalism. that is what built our country. we send them a strong message. as americans, we need to back up the present by getting more involved with the senate. e-mail in your search senator, your congressman and even the president. -- e-mail your senator, the congressman, and even the president. host: we will leave it there. talk to us a little bit about what barry brought up. it
, and we will talk about the economic policy implications of where we are. >> august returns to washington next week, and now we preview the commercial agenda in the land and the relationship with president obama. panelists include a former labor secretary elaine chao and president of the center for american progress, neera tanden. this is half an hour. >> see you again. all right. jared is over there. let me just real quickly -- elaine chao, now at the heritage foundation, is a former secretary of labor. alex brill, senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. neera tanden is the president of the center for american progress, formerly chief policy adviser for hillary clinton and a 2008 and 2016 -- sorry. [laughter] jared bernstein is a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities, former chief economic adviser to joe biden and in 2000 and 20 -- no, sorry. we should have separated you two, actually. >> today is a day for half the purpose of the families. >> -- happy progress of families. >> we have to start with the big question. obviously, we are in a position where
of the national committee can do. would you do interfere in primaries, it is washington dictating and party bosses dictating. you get what you get. look what happens. they heard not just themselves, but they heard the entire party's brand. and enormously talented group of people that did not deserve what they got here. that was the outcome. it looks like democrats probably will pick up a seat. then you get to the house. the house seesawed a little bit. well within the frame of what we were expecting, somewhere between a wash and democrats picked up 10 seats. we had a broad think of anywhere from republicans picking up a seed or two or democrats picking up eight. right now we are looking like it is in the five-eight seats to gain for democrats. i think the gust of wind at the end helped them, too. is he saw a little bit in the evening. early on it looked like republicans were doing very well. there was one. it looks like republicans were going to pick up some seats. then you started seeing -- who would have thought that? alan west losing. it went on, it sort of was kicking back over a little bit to
at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> tomorrow on "washington journal" with will talk about immigration reform by republicans and democrats and potential areas of compromise. our get is fawn johnson with "are national journal." followed by a look at the role of money in the 2012 election whofment spent it where and what roles super pacs played. we're joined by managing editor kathy kiely. and tax rates and what tax cuts are expected to expire at the end of the year. lindy paull is our guest. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. next former george w. bush national security adviser stephen hadley said getting america's house in order should be the country's top priority. he also spoke about the wars in iraq and afghanistan and how president obama may be forced to deal with iran. mr. hadley was part of the national security conference hosted by the world affairs council of america. it's about 35 minutes. >> thank you so much. good morning, everyone. welcome, steve. it's a real, real pleasure to have you here this morning. we're going to dive right in. i want to begin first by givi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)